PM trends in Canada? WePivot (slowly)

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for rent

Technology is not the new flavour. How do we manage the change process? 

Josh Lipton moderated an insightful panel discussion with industry leaders at the 2017 PM expo Wednesday afternoon.  Here’s my take-away…

Peter Altobelli, VP of Yardi Canada, reflecting on the evolution of commercial leasing, spoke about change management with the confidence that comes from years of steadying the ship.  He discussed the impact of “WeWork” the latest disruptor, completely unforeseeable as a business model in previous decades.  Waves of humiliation rolled over in fear that I probably had no idea what he was talking about.  Then suddenly, aha! I HAD heard about WeWork.  A notice in my inbox from the Meetup Community announcing it had been acquired.  All for We

Robert Plateck, Founder/CEO of SensorSuite  and Building Systems Engineer, Laura Tousley spoke on the importance of open architecture for software integration of legacy systems and future expansion to optimize everything.  I starting thinking building performance like indoor air quality and energy consumption;  tenant information and concierge services, maintenance, security, life safety all connected and operated from a single dashboard.  I imagined systems linked to reporting and remittance functions (like energy benchmarking) informing financial planning and providing intelligence to risk management in real time.

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Core readiness for future proofing will include building infrastructure investments in wired, wireless and radio communications.  The importance of cybersecurity and training on the devices and apps that interact with the building cannot be overstated.  I had heard that same warning delivered at an earlier seminar and made a mental note to flag these as barriers to user adoption.   The Buzz in the room agreed.

 

Plan an exist strategy for software use.  Who owns the data? Can you transport all your work to a new platform?  

 

Our panel’s vision of the future extends beyond a fully automated, integrated and even modular building to include smart neighbourhoods, powered by local solar/wind generation.  Energy storage and local demand response are other strategies that have been tested to improve service where power outages are common.  Knowledge will increase in the deployment of battery energy storage for peak shaving and further the clean energy market.

Max Steinman Director of Sales for Landlord Web Solutions reflected on the trend toward marketing running everything at the site level.  3D virtual tours complete with virtual/augmented reality may soon replace the role of the leasing agent.  Having worked with the folks at iGuide, I was somewhat familiar with that reality…slipping into the not too distant future I imagined all of the savings possible (time, fuel, disappointment, not to mention the inconvenience to existing tenants and pets).  Virtual tours would show the space in pristine condition at any hour of the day, provide accurate room dimensions with tools for furniture placement and estimating window coverings, appliance specifications, and more.  One stop collaborative tools for connecting to local utility providers, day care centres, grocery delivery, movers, driverless car pick-up…

ball-563972_1920

What process/analysis can be put in place for a new vender?

 

What specific applications and collaboration tools work with senior housing? Student residences? Family multi-residential? Commercial tenants?

 

Engagement Engagement Engagement

 

Forget Credit Karma, artificial intelligence will predict tenant behaviour and launch  credit check accuracy, employment and personality screening to a new level enabling instant tenant approvals.  Out pops a smart lease, ready for immediate digital endorsement thanks to the advancement of blockchain technology.  Questions about living in the building? Neighbours? There’s a chatbot for that.  Keys?  Yep, fully functional on moving day and you can probably unlock a private storage locker in advance as a signing bonus.  Just hit the send button on the lease to seal the deal.

 

Data driven, experience driven, and tenant driven change are the new forces bearing down on landlords 

 

images2

think mobile

think Millennials

think bed bug registry

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Sounds like Spring in Elmira

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Great fun Saturday, April 2nd in Woolwich Township

at the annual

Elmira Maple Syrup Festival

Sights & Sounds…Satisfying Sweets & Savories

Visit:
festival facebook page
elmiramaplesyrup.com

Elmira, Ontario

AccessAbility 101

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AccessAbility: Social Integration by Design

March 7th, 2016 at Carleton University

Sonia Zouari, CCCA, CSP, Chair of CSC Ottawa Chapter moderates the panel discussion 

Speakers: 

Councillor Marianne Wilkinson, Ward 4 Kanata North (www.marianne wilkinson.com)
Amy Pothier, Accessibility & Building Code Specialist at Gensler, Toronto
Allen Mankewich, Communications Coordinator & Policy Analyst at the Canadian Centre for Disability Studies
Roger P. Gervais, Certified Aging in Place Specialist
Steve Titus, BA Sc., PEng Aercoustics Engineering, Toronto
Dean Mellway, READ initiative (Research, Education, Accessibility & Design) at Carleton University, Ottawa

collage MWilkinson

 

Recommended by Amy: Accessibility+Resources

Carleton University spreading a culture of accessibility

collage_Dean Mellway

 VisitAble Housing Canada

VisitAble Housing From Concept to Reality Tickets Wed 23 Mar 2016 at 10 00 AM Eventbrite

Workshop March 23/16 in Waterloo

collage_Allen Mankewich

Inclusion Summit 2016

collage_Roger Gervais

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aging in Place Gracefully

Duty of Care?

Museums & Musings in Winnipeg

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A mindful and memorable experience

A walking tour of downtown Winnipeg, the Forks and the Canadian Museum for Human Rights.  Fun Night at the historic Metropolitan hosted by the Winnipeg Chapter of Construction Specifications Canada during the 2015 National Conference

Thank you CSC Winnipeg! What will the Atlantic Chapter do for an encore in 2016?
Check out their pitch here

Soundtrack by Dan Walsh recorded live on Beaver Street in Preston

 

links:
The Forks
The Metropolitan

milling about Hespeler

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the illustrious Mill Girls of Hespeler

while employed at Dominion Woollens and Worsteds

Soundtrack recorded at the Hespeler Heritage Centre

11 Tannery St., East in Cambridge, ON

Gramophone playback of Bing Crosby singing "Swinging On A Star" 
by songwriters Johnny Burke & James Van Heusen

more about the history of Hespeler Village at:
Visit Cambridge Ontario
The Company of Neighbours
Hespeler Heritage Centre facebook page
Jonathan Walford’s blog
The Star Nov 26, 2011

uwaterloo library archives

Lary in the News

Talkin’ it up! – The Mill Girls of Hespeler

LYRICS:
Would you like to swing on a star?
Carry moonbeams home in a jar
And be better off than you are
Or would you rather be a mule?

A mule is an animal with long funny ears
Kicks up at anything he hears
His back is brawny but his brain is weak
He’s just plain stupid with a stubborn streak
And by the way, if you hate to go to school
You may grow up to be a mule

Or would you like to swing on a star?
Carry moonbeams home in a jar
And be better off than you are
Or would you rather be a pig?

A pig is an animal with dirt on his face
His shoes are a terrible disgrace
He has no manners when he eats his food
He’s fat and lazy and extremely rude
But if you don’t care a feather or a fig
You may grow up to be a pig

Or would you like to swing on a star?
Carry moonbeams home in a jar
And be better off than you are
Or would you rather be a fish?

A fish won’t do anything, but swim in a brook
He can’t write his name or read a book
To fool the people is his only thought
And though he’s slippery, he still gets caught
But then if that sort of life is what you wish
You may grow up to be a fish

A new kind of jumped-up slippery fish
And all the monkeys aren’t in the zoo
Every day you meet quite a few
So, you see it’s all up to you
You can be better than you are
You could be swingin’ on a star

SJU CAMPUS & The Art of Building Backwards

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We're digging the future of  St. Jerome's University
Breaking Ground in Waterloo Region

A LOOK INSIDE THE BIG ROOM

A Look Inside The Big Room is a link to a Prezi storyboard that captures my experience in the “big room” in February 2014 as an observer and complete newbie to Lean Methodology & IPD as a Project Delivery Method. Thanks to Arthur Winslow for opening the door (again) and for the encouragement to keep asking lots of questions.  

“transformative innovation requires the deliberate support of enabling organizational culture, perspectives and processes” Roger Martin

ST. JEROME’S UNIVERSITY IN THE NEWS:

Globe and Mail Report

Diamond Schmitt Architects 

Daily Commercial News

Graham Construction

Lean Construction.org

Construction Canada Magazine

WHAT IS IPD?

a teamwork approach

WHO ELSE IS USING IT?

Town of Oakville

Province of Saskachewan

Daily Commercial News

Twenty Questions you have been dying to ask about Re-amping

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reamp

The goal of the reamp box is to make the amplifier react in
exactly the same way a live guitar would,
but with a pre-recorded audio source

Q. 1  What is re-amping?

Re-amping is the process whereby the direct signal from a guitar, bass or keyboard is recorded — usually on a separate track alongside the signal captured simultaneously with a microphone from an amp — and later routed to an amp in a studio to be miked up and overdubbed.

Q.2  Why is it used?

This approach allows the choice of amp or amp settings, or mic and mic position, to be changed after the initial recorded performance, but without the compromises and limitations inherent in trying to process an already recorded amp sound. It is a popular and widely used technique, although it is more common in the production of some musical genres than others.

Q.3  Does Re-amping save time?

Re-amping can be both a time saver and a time waster, depending on how and why it is employed! As a way of modifying a guitar part to better suit the track as the mix progresses, it is an invaluable technique, saving the time and effort of having to record a new performance. However, if used to avoid committing to a sound during tracking, it can be an enormous time waster.

Q.4  What does a re-amping box do?

There are various products available with integrated facilities for re-amping, as well as dedicated re-amping units, although the latter approach seems the more popular. There is nothing complicated about a re-amp box, which, in most cases, is essentially a passive DI box used in reverse.

A re-amping box accepts a balanced line‑level signal (nominally +4dBu) and converts it to an unbalanced instrument‑level signal (nominally ‑18dBu), usually via a transformer. A variable level control is often provided to optimize the level fed to the amp, along with a ground‑lift facility to separate the balanced source and unbalanced output grounds, thus avoiding ground‑loop hum problems.

A passive DI box can often be used reasonably well in this role, although it is normally necessary to attenuate the line‑level input significantly, to avoid saturating the transformer and generating an excessive unbalanced output level. Alternatively, the kind of line-level balanced/unbalanced interface intended for connecting domestic equipment to professional systems can be used, and the original ART CleanBox is often recommended in this role. However, for only a slightly greater outlay, a dedicated re-amp box, such as the Radial ProRMP, is rather more convenient to use.  .

Thanks to SOS for the above four answers!

 

Q.5  What musical changes are achieved by re-amping ?

Examples of common re-amping objectives include musically useful amplifier distortion, room tone, compression, EQ/filters, envelopes, resonance, and gating.

Q.6  What is meant by “warming up” dry tracks ?

Re-amping is often used to “warm up” dry tracks, which often means adding complex, musically interesting compression, distortion, filtering, ambience, and other pleasing effects. By playing a dry signal through a studio’s main monitors and then using room mics to capture the ambience, engineers are able to create realistic reverbs and blend the wet signal with the original dry recording to achieve the desired amount of depth.

Q.7  What are some advantages of re-amping ?

Re-amping allows guitarists and other electronic musicians to record their tracks and go home, leaving the engineer and producer to spend more time dialing in “just right” settings and effects on prerecorded tracks. When re-amping electric guitar tracks, the guitarist need not be present for the engineer to experiment long hours with a range of effects, mic positions, speaker cabinets, amplifiers, effects pedals, and overall tonality – continuously replaying the prerecorded tracks while experimenting with new settings and tones. When a desired tone is finally achieved, the guitarist’s dry performance is re-recorded, or “re-amped,” with all added effects.

Q.8  Who were some of the early ‘pioneers’ of re-amping ?

Les Paul and Mary Ford recorded layered vocal harmonies and guitar parts, modifying prior tracks with effects such as ambient reverb while recording the net result together on a new track. Les Paul placed a loudspeaker at one end of a tunnel and a microphone at the other end. The loudspeaker played back previously recorded material – the microphone recorded the resulting altered sound.

Thanks to Wikipedia for answering questions #5 to #9!

Q.9  Why is re-amping so popular?

Re-amping is a technique that gained a lot of popularity in the last 15 years. The technique’s obvious advantages are numerous:

  • Direct recording is an ideal way to reserve tonal flexibility for mixing (especially useful in the DIY world);
  • Instrument amplifiers and stomp boxes offer virtually limitless opportunities to create the right sound with a not-so-virtual interface;
  • It’s fun, which is still allowed.

Sometimes the re-amping goal is simple. An electric guitar can be recorded direct while monitoring a software amp simulator. During mixing the direct guitar track (sans faux amp) will be re-recorded through an actual amp.

Q.10  What does the work flow look like ?

Re-Amp Signal Flow

Other popular uses include adding some grit to a direct bass track, rescuing underwhelming keyboard sounds, or using your favorite stomp boxes as outboard processing. In any case, if the goal of the process is amp-related, you can be sure it is also more or less distortion-related.

Sompbox Outboard Workflowa

Q.11  How do you manage the gain staging of a re-amped signal?

As pictured above, the re-amp process requires us to adapt the balanced, relatively low impedance output from our DAW to the unbalanced, high impedance input of the amp or pedal(s) in question. The biggest factor in managing the gain staging of your re-amping signal chain is your choice of adapter.

The two choices are:

  1. A purpose built adapter, like the ones made by the company called Reamp, or Radial Engineering; or
  2. A passive direct box (so say some).

The purpose-built re-amping devices (most of which are derivative of John Cuniberti’s early 1990’s design) have the distinct advantage of being designed to operate in the amplitude and impedance ranges typically found in +4dBu pro audio and the instrument amplifier world. The same cannot be said of a typical passive direct box. These are important characteristics of inductive systems.

That’s not to say you can’t get the signal flow happening with a passive DI and an adequate amount of attenuation. However, the passive DI fails to simply supply a properly adapted signal. If your goal is to use the amps and pedals as signal processors, the adapter ought to facilitate that work, not pile on it’s own distortion.

Q.12  How do you address the relative phase of the original & the re-amped signal ?

Relative Phase

In applications where the originally recorded signal and the re-amped signal will be used in the mix together, their relative phase is an important tone-shaping factor.

There are two great options for addressing the relative phase of these two signals (options that put a polarity switch to shame):

  1. Speaker to mic distance. For many signals, moving the microphone back and forth along the pick-up axis will reveal a dramatic range of tonal difference. This can be particularly apparent with signals that have complex midrange harmonic content.
  2. Phase ‘alignment’ tools, like the IBP from Little Labs. Used as the re-amping adapter or after the mic pre-amplified return, these devices provide sweepable electronic control over relative phase. This allows the mic to stay in the spot you liked the most.

Regardless of your choice of tool, remember that relative phase is a subjective tone control in this setting. Don’t think about what’s right or wrong.

Q.13  What do you do if the two signals do not sound right together ?

Sometimes it can be difficult to decide whether the original signal should be used in combination with the re-amped signal. In these cases there’s usually something unique about each signal, but they may not be working together well.

This conflict can often be resolved by creating more contrast between the original and re-amped signals. On keyboard tracks, for example, I will frequently make significant, crossover-style EQ choices that allow me to more subtly combine the unique elements of each signal type.

Another technique that can be used with remarkable ease is one I dubiously call “Sum and Amp-ness”. I think it kills for gritty bass, particularly with tight, close drums.

  1. Use a DI bass right up the middle of your mix. Get it sounding great, and setup a re-amp path;
  2. Setup a nicely overdriven bass tone on an amp. Somewhere in signal flow, HPF this path in the 300 – 500Hz neighborhood. I like to do it before the amp;
  3. Use the return from the amp just as you would use the ‘side’ component of a mid-side mic array. For maximum sum and difference affect, mic the amp off-axis.

This set-up leaves you with strong, centered low frequency focus, but adds an interesting distorted ‘width’ component. Try it out in mono-tending drum and bass situations.

Finally, don’t be afraid to let the re-amp path hang out in input monitoring while you mix. There’s no real reason to record it until you’re getting close to printing mixes. It’s incredibly easy to make changes as long as it’s all still live.

Thanks to Pro Audio Files for answering questions #9 to #13!

 

 Q.14  How do you load down a guitar ?

THE LOADING ISSUE

To capture a characteristic guitar sound, you need to record the same thing you would hear if the guitar connected directly to an amp. Although many people like the “high-fidelity” sound of a guitar feeding an ultra-high impedance input, others prefer the slight dulling that occurs with a low-impedance load (e.g., around 5-100 kohms) as found with some effects boxes, older solid-state amps, etc. This is especially useful when the guitar precedes distortion, as distorting high frequencies can give a grating, brittle effect that resembles Sponge Bob on helium.

There are several ways to load down your guitar:

  •  Find a box that loads down your guitar by the desired amount, then split the guitar to both the box and the mixer or audio interface’s “guitar” input.
  • If your recorder, mixer, or sound card has a guitar input, try using one of the regular line level inputs instead.
  • Use a box with variable input impedance (e.g., the “drag control” on Radial products)
  • Create a special patch cord with the desired amount of loading by soldering a resistor between the hot and ground of either one of the plugs. A typical value would be 10 kohms.
  • If you’re going through host software with plug-ins, insert an EQ and roll off the desired amount of highs before feeding whatever produces distortion (e.g., an outboard amp that feeds back into the host, or an amp simulator plug-in). However, this doesn’t sound quite as authentic as actually loading down the pickup, which creates more complex tonal changes.

 Note that you need to add this load while recording, as it’s the interaction between the pickup’s inductance and load that produces the desired effect. Once the dry track is recorded, the pickup is out of the picture.

But just because we have a signal doesn’t mean we can go home and collect our royalties, because this signal now goes through a signal path that may include pedals and other devices. As guitarists are very sensitive to the tone of their rigs, even the slightest variation from what’s expected may be a problem. For example, the transformers in some direct boxes or preamps color the sound slightly, so the guitarist might want to send the signal through the transformer, even though transformer isolation is usually not necessary with a signal coming from a recorder.

 Q.15  What are some plug-ins and interfaces available ?

Traditional re-amping is replaced by virtual re-amping using guitar-amp plug‑ins, many of which offer remarkably good quality and enormous versatility. The process is exactly the same, but without having to physically route the signal out of the DAW and into a real amp in a real studio, miked up with real mics.

Plug-ins and low-latency audio interfaces have opened up “virtual re-amping” options. Guitar-oriented plug-ins include IK Multimedia AmpliTube, Native Instruments Guitar Rig, Line 6 POD Farm, Scuffham Amps, Waves G|T|R|, iZotope Trash, Peavey ReValver, Overloud TH2, McDSP Chrome Tone, and others.

The concept is similar to hardware-based re-amping: Record the direct signal to a track, and monitor through an amp. The key to “virtual re-amping” is that the host records a straight (dry) guitar signal to the track. So, any processing that occurs depends entirely on the plug-in(s) you’ve selected; you can process the guitar as desired while mixing, including changing “virtual amps.” When mixing, you can use different plug-ins for different amp sounds, and/or do traditional hardware re-amping by sending the recorded track through an output, then into a mic’ed hardware amp.

Q.16  What are the limitations when using a plug-in ?

Using plug-ins has limitations. If feedback is part of your sound, there’s no easy way to create a feedback loop with a direct-recorded track. This is one reason for monitoring through a real amp, as any effect the amp has on your strings will be recorded in the direct track. Still, this isn’t as interactive as feeding back with the amp that creates your final sound. And plug-ins themselves have limitations; although digital technology does a remarkable job of modeling amp sounds, picky purists may pout that some subtleties that don’t translate well.

Furthermore, monitoring through a host program demands low-latency drivers (e.g., Steinberg ASIO, Apple Core Audio, or Microsoft’s low-latency drivers like WDM/KS). Otherwise, you’ll hear a delay as you play. Although there will always be some delay due to the A/D and D/A conversion process, with modern systems total latency can often be under 10ms. For some perspective, 3 ms of latency is about the same delay that would occur if you moved your head 1 meter (3 feet) further from a speaker—not really enough to affect the “feel” of your playing.

If latency is an issue, there are other ways to monitor, like ASIO Direct Monitoring. Input signal monitoring (often called zero-latency monitoring) is essentially instantaneous; the signal appearing at the audio interface input is simply directed to the audio interface out, without passing through any plug-ins. With this method you can also feed the output to a guitar amp for monitoring, while recording the straight signal on tape.

In any event, regardless of whether you use hardware re-amping, virtual re-amping, or a combination, the fact that the process lets you go back and change a track’s fundamental sound without having to re-record it is significant. If you haven’t tried re-amping yet, give it a shot—it will add a useful new tool to your bag of tricks.

Q.17  When did the term “re-amping” come into use ?

Background: A History of Re-Amping

by Peter Janis, Radial Engineering

As with so many aspects of audio, it’s hard to pin down exactly when a technique was first used, and that goes for re-amping. While Reamp made the first commercial box designed expressly for this purpose, engineers had already been creating re-amping setups for years.  Recording historian Doug Mitchell, Associate Professor at Middle Tennessee State University, comments that “The process of ‘re-amping’ has actually been utilized since the early days of recording in a variety of methods. However, the actual process may not have been referred to as re-amping until perhaps the late ’60s or ’70s. From the early possibilities of recording sound, various composers and experimenters utilized what might be termed ‘re-amping’ to take advantage of the recording process and to expand upon its possibilities.

The first commercially available box for re-amping has been tweaked and revised over the years.

In 1913 Italian Futurist Luigi Russolo proposed something he termed the ‘Art of Noises.’ Recordings of any sound (anything was legitimate) were made on Berliner discs and played back via ‘noise machines’ in live scenarios and re-recorded on ‘master’ disc cutters. This concept was furthered by Pierre Schaeffer and his ‘Musique Concrète’ electronic music concept in the ’30s and ’40s. Schaeffer would utilize sounds such as trains in highly manipulated processes to compose new music ideas. These processes often involved the replaying and acoustic re-recording of material in a manipulated fashion. Other experimenters in this area included Karlheinz Stockhausen and Edgard Varèse.

With the possibilities presented by magnetic recording, the process of what might be termed re-amping was utilized in other ‘pop’ music areas. Perhaps the first person to take advantage of this was Les Paul. His recordings with Mary Ford often utilized multiple harmonies all performed by Mary. Initially these harmonies were performed via the re-amping process. Later, Les convinced Ampex to make the first 8-track recorder so that he might utilize track comping to perform a similar function. Les is also credited with the utilization of the re-amping process for the creation of reverberant soundfields, by placing a loudspeaker at one end of a long tunnel area under his home and a microphone at the other end. Reverberation time could be altered with the placement of the microphone with respect to the loudspeaker playing back previously recorded material.

Wall of sound pioneer Phil Spector is perhaps the most widely accredited for the use of the re-amping process, and because of his association with the Beatles, is potentially regarded today as the developer of the process. However, Phil was actually refining a process and exploring its possibility for use in rock music.

Thanks to Harmony Central  for answering questions #14 to #17!

Q.18  Can you build your own re-amping box ?

Yes!  How to Build a DIY Reamping Box

One of the most powerful tools for expanding your sonic pallet in the studio is a reamping box–a box that converts the output from your mixer/interface/tape machine to an instrument-level signal. Suddenly, all of your guitar amps, effects pedals, and synthesizers become effects for any signal you can throw at them.

A reamping box is a great first-project for DIY beginners: it’s totally passive (you can’t shock yourself), there are a limited number of solder joints to make, and there’s plenty of room to make those joints. For a better idea of what’s involved in this build, check out this video on how to make a simple reamping box:  here

LINE2AMP diy kit

Full kits are currently available, including everything needed to complete the project:

  • High-quality transformer by Edcor USA
  • Pre-drilled, diecast aluminum case
  • TRS jacks by Neutrik
  • Xicon metal-film resistor
  • Toggle switch
  • All hookup wire needed
  • Nut, bolt, and lock washer for ground connection

 

Q.19  What does guitar re-amping sound like?

In a nutshell, it sounds real. Follow this link for examples from Pure Mix Advanced Audio.  Thanks to Ben Lindell for this awesome tutorial

Quite a difference right? I love how the reamped track is crunchy but with some life to it. So what was my signal path? This track started with my Telecaster running into the Demeter Tube DI box connected to a DBX 386 pre and into my Digidesign 192. Then for reamping the signal traveled out of a Digidesign 192 into the Little Labs Redeye then into a Mesa Boogie Nomad 55 on the clean channel with the ‘Pushed’ switch flipped. I recorded it with a Beyerdynamic M 201 TG about a foot away going through one of my custom germanium preamps and combined that with a Neumann U87 in omni a bit further away running though an API 3124 preamp and into an 1176 to maximize the room tone.

 

Reamping Guitar

Q.20  What are some of the applications promoted by “REAMP” ?

courtesy of http://www.danalexanderaudio.com/reamp.html :

1. Change amplifier make, tone settings, and effects at any time after original performance. A flat direct safety track is recommended but not always necessary for the best results. Preserve the inspired first-takes, always knowing you can REAMP later if you are unhappy with the amplified sound.

2. Engineers and producers can experiment with mic placement and room ambiance without asking the musician to keep playing over and over. Record a scratch direct signal on tape/disk and feed it to the musician’s amp via the REAMP and experiment.

3. Insert instrument effects at any time during production. REAMP from tape/disk to any stomp box (such as a wah-wah, or overdrive), then take the effects output and return it to the console via a direct box.

4. Live recordings direct from the instrument’s output to tape/disk can later be REAMP’ed in the studio. This solves many problems related to remote recording. You can match the sound for a punch in by using the original instrument and direct box, thereby making only small repairs. After the repairs are done, REAMP to any amplifier instead of re-recording the entire performance. The REAMP is the cheapest insurance policy going!

5. Insert studio pre-amps, equalizers, signal processors, and dynamics control before reaching the instrument amplifier.

6. Synthesized guitar and bass tracks can sound more live-like by RE-AMPing into an instrument amplifier and using mics. Send drum tracks to various instrument amps and mic the room for ambiance.

7. No need to record instrument amps during a tracking session if space or leakage is a problem; perfect for late night home recording. The next day plug in your amp, turn it up and REAMP the previous night’s performance. Record the bass direct and REAMP later to tape/disk or during the mix.

8. REAMP the same performance with different amps and stack the sounds for various textures and panning. You can use the REAMP to overdrive the front end of a guitar amp for intense distortion by turning up the REAMP’s trim control to eleven!!

 

CSC Design Challenge to #reimagine🚂 1655 Dupont

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Drop in and visit the CSC Student Design Challenge exhibit in the Winner’s Lounge at Expo 2019, live off the floor at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre on February 27th.  Sample the iGuide virtual tour of 1655 Dupont Street in Toronto, site of the 2019 Design Challenge.

🔗 meet Michael Vervena at iGuide

🔗meet Cathie Schneider, Co-Chair of the Design Competition Committee
🔗 visit cscdesignchallenge.ca  🔗 like us on facebook

🔗Building Design & Construction at George Brown College

 

21:31:41 CSCeXpo2019

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Montage video recap of the 41st annual CSC Building Expo (21:31) shot live off the floor on February 27th, 2019.

I suited up and slew snowmaggedon on the Kitchener line GoTrain to Union Station, complete with all ten poster boards from last year’s design challenge safely in tow.

While frantically rummaging through pockets for my presto card, I caught a glimpse of Regional Councillor/City of Waterloo Mayor David Jaworsky waiting to board the train.  Reflecting on his 2018 year-end interview with Craig Norris on The Morning Edition (*1) put a smile on my face despite an undertone of grumpiness for neglecting to make time for morning java.

20 sec mark🔖 “Construction in Today’s Connected World” was the keynote address from Dr. Rick Huijbreigts, the VP of Strategy and Innovation at George Brown College.  Dr. Huijbreights expands on the convergence of IoT devices in building automation systems with low-voltage PoE, smart lighting, cloud management and analytics, all protected by emerging cybersecurity operational standards (*2) Yep, caught myself smiling again even before the aroma of coffee reached the table.

It was refreshing to see so many student volunteers from the college engaged at the expo; serving the industry, asking questions and making connections. The train has indeed left the station

 

2m30s mark🔖 Next stop on the tour we hear from Charles W. Skipper, partner at Foglar, Rubinoff LLP and no stranger to the Toronto Construction Association. The Queen’s University alumni cut his teeth articling with the Ministry of Attorney General before practicing commercial litigation at a major Toronto law firm.  At Fogler, Rubinoff LLP since 1996, his expertise in the dynamics of construction and commercial disputes is highly sought after. Charles obtained his Master’s Degree in Law (LL.M) (Civil Litigation and Dispute Resolution) from Osgoode Hall, York University in 1998, specializing in construction litigation. He is a Harvard Law School trained negotiator, a lover of ancient history, and a surprisingly funny guy with a decent throwing arm (not captured in this video) (*3)

this is justice and I think it’s great, but I must say that I never had any idea in my life that you could ask so many questions for so long about so little 

 

6m06s mark🔖A sobering overview of changes to the Construction Lien Act including lien registration/perfection, holdback, trust fund obligations, prompt payment rules and interim adjudication (*4)

18m01s mark🔖 CSC Student Design Challenge: the top five entries of the 2018 design competition on display in the winner’s lounge🥂

Cathie Schneider, Co-Chair of the CSC student design competition committee shares her enthusiasm with Michael Vervena as he demonstrates the use of iGuide’s 3D virtual tour of the 2019 Design Challenge site at 1655 Dupont Street in Toronto.

*1) Things that matter to Mayor Dave Jaworsky
*2) US legislation to improve IoT security
*3) Bell Canada v. Olympia & York Developments Ltd., 1994 CanLII 239 (ON CA)
*4) Changes to the Construction Act  

IoT Jiggidy Jig

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home again home again

for the IoT Mind to Market Seminar

at Catalyst137

Presentations from Steven Fyke, Creative Director at SnapPea Design, Mike Brown, Senior Director, Sales and Business Development at Swift Labs, Joel Dart, Manager of Sales and Business Development for Bell – IoT Solutions,  Robert Rodriques for Sigma Point Technologies, Greg Dashwood, Product Lead,  Internet of Things & Advanced Analytics at Microsoft and Alexander Fesiak, IoT Business Development Manager at Arrow Global.  Opening remarks by Jean-Pierre Bhavnani of Miovision

Links:
snappeadesign.com/
swiftlabs.com/about-2/
iot.bell.ca/en/
sigmapoint.com/about-us/
azure.microsoft.com/en-us/overview/iot/
arrow.com/en/iot

Sue & Ryan & Sam – for the love of

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Making Music

The Weber Brothers

For Sue Windover

An unexpected stroll into the heart of an artist to celebrate the release of

Park Your Boots

 

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Discover What I Don’t Know

and

Sample the latest CD from Sue Windover

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Special thanks to friend & folk artist Sandy MacDonald – for making the evening completeHappy to hear we will be seeing more of you in DTK!!

 

Don’t miss the Weber Brothers live

on Friday June 8th

at the MattW

Starlight 

 

with special guest

Matt Weidinger

And before you arrive

watch

Before We Arrive 

A feature length documentary of the Weber Duo’s musical journey

 

24 for 48 Ontario

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Congratulations Winners!

Awards Night on May 16th held in the Atrium at Catalyst 137 – The site of last year’s design competition.  Gorgeous space – thank-you Frank, PM Riley & the Building Team – a pleasure!

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Shout out to our esteemed judges who made it possible to narrow down from 24 inspiring and noteworthy entries.  Well done students!

Adjudication Website Screenshot

Teams from Ryerson University, OCAD, UWaterloo, Conestoga College participated and five challengers rose to the top:

Fifth Place:  “Statera” – Conestoga College Team: Mashael Alharbi, Chelsea Hummel & Amber MacPherson

Fourth Place: “Blues & Brews” – UWaterloo Team: Marius Hexan, Alexandra Siu, Hayley Sykes & Emmeily Zhang:IMG_5690.JPG

Third Place: “The Dark Room Hotel” – OCAD Team:  Tori Wang, Lily Ni & Feeleng Leng:Third Place Winners.JPG

Second Place: “The Four-Eight” – UWaterloo Team: Teresa Tran, Azadeh Shayanfar, Anisha Sankar & Parisa Hassanzadegan:IMG_5703.JPG

First Place: “House of Tech & Blues” – UWaterloo Team: Lauren Kyle, Jeremy Jeong, Justyna Maleszyk, Michelle Piotrowski & Keegan Steeper:IMG_5695.JPG

Just AWEsome…for more about the Student Design Competition, visit the official website at cscdesignchallenge.ca

 

Glenn Smith Digs the Blues

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Glenn Smith shares his memories of ‘the Legion’ at 48 Ontario Street during a live interview with Martin de Groot shot at the Commons Studio.  Back in 1986 he began a new venture as a concert promoter, introducing an impressive rotation of blues talent to a receptive local audience.  Revisit our walk-about in February HERE

Legendary performances and Sold-Out shows at the Legion Dance Hall animate the story of Kitchener’s love affair with the Blues

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48 Ontario Street, an unassuming treasure nestled in Kitchener’s downtown technology cluster is the site of the 5th annual CSC Student Design Competition

Press Release Here

The winners of this year’s Design Challenge will be announced during the annual Grand Valley Chapter Connections Café on Wednesday, May 16th in the Atrium at Catalyst137 

Glenn – so appreciate the interview and your endorsement of the competition, but thank you most of all for the many years of gutsy investment in live music.  You’re the real deal.

Hope to see those posters someday!

 

Waterloo Region In The Making

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Professor Rick Haldenby delivers an insightful and entertaining address to an audience of real estate enthusiasts at a breakfast event hosted by the KW Association of Realtors on Thursday, April 5th, 2018 at Bingemans Marshall Hall.

It is always a pleasure to hear Professor Haldenby speak. His passion for the industrial architecture of Waterloo Region is infectious, inspired by the wisdom of post war city builders whose economic development strategy enabled significant investment in training and education; building, as if with secret foreknowledge, the urban stage we see today. Act One of the Illustrious Industrious City was only a first draft, with the Second Act well into production with (seemingly) weekly funding announcements and new Scenes crafted in the presence of tech giants, plant expansions, and flourishing start-ups.

The Proverb ” A good man leaves an inheritance to his children’s children…” comes to mind as I reflect on Rick’s message summoned by the conviction that the “Waterloo Phenomena” has been made possible by inheritance. What really surprises me is that it remains unabashed throughout the panel discussion. We heard from four of the Region’s largest and most progressive developers: Craig Beattie (Perimeter Development Corporation), Scott Higgins (Hip Developments), Mike Maxwell (Momentum Developments), and Anne Marchildon (Andrin Ltd). Each one shared their perspective, back stories and vision with the civic pride and sincerity that comes with a personal commitment to the Region and a lot of skin in the game.

Yep, I’m going to listen to the tape again, to be sure it wasn’t just the chocolate chip pastries, but somehow I know they get inheritance…hmmm…stay tuned.

Brent Davis covers the event at The Record

More from Rick Haldenby…a series of thirteen video shorts recorded in 2016 at CSC & The Case of the Illustrious Industrious City: Act 1 Scene 1

Scott Higgins, President of Hip Developments Inc. expands on the ROI of “getting a little bit crazy” at Waterloo Region In The Making.  Scott leads his team to be bold, think big and take action focused on building creativity and culture, a guiding principle of their construction projects.

Memories of prepping for the Riverbank Lofts launch party in Hespeler Village…

Links:
Hip Developments
Launch Waterloo
Waterloo Chronicle
Day In The District
Cambridge Times